Hot Topics

Hot Topics

What’s this fish? – KASUGODAI (Young Sea Bream)

– February 1, 2021 – Kasugodai, or young sea bream, translates to “spring day” or “spring child” sea bream in Japanese. Kasugodai can be caught throughout the year, but because of its name, it is considered a spring fish. Its size produces a firmer texture than Madai (sea bream,) therefore it is important that chefs…

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ENJOY SAKE! Atsu-kan (Hot Sake)

– February 1, 2021 – Across the world, alcoholic beverages are most commonly served chilled or at room temperature. In Japan, Atsu-kan or hot sake, is just as popular as Hiya or cold sake. In fact, Atsu-kan is more popular than Hiya during winter months. Atsu-kan and Hiya are used as general terminology for hot…

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WHAT YOU SEE IN JAPAN THIS MONTH – Kadomatsu

– January 2, 2021 – In the New Year season, you see Kadomatsu placed at the entrance of houses and buildings all over Japan. Toshigami-sama (or “the deity of the year”) visits each household and business, but Kadomatsu is used as a sign to inform the deity that the household is ready and welcoming. Kado…

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FISH OF MONTH-Yamame (freshwater cherry trout) Roe

– January 2, 2021 – We are all familiar with the recognizable shiny orange color of the popular sushi ingredient, salmon roe. Yamame (freshwater cherry trout) is a sibling fish of salmon and spends its entire life in fresh water. Its roe is even more distinct with a golden yellow color. While it is a…

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SAKE FOR DECEMBER – KOTSUZUMI “HANAFUBUKI”

– Dec 1, 2020 – KOTSUZUMI “HANAFUBUKI” Nishiyama Brewery (Hyogo, Japan) Established in 1849, Nishiyama Brewery is in its 6th generation and the sake-making tradition has been passed down from generation to generation for over 170 years. Most of the sake is made from rice grown by local farmers however, in their estate paddies, a…

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Japanese Culture – Oh-misoka

– Dec 1, 2020 – Oh-misoka means the end of year, particularly December 31. Winter break in schools usually starts a few days before Christmas Day and ends around January 7. Although the majority of Japanese people are Buddhists, the country is filled with Christmas decoration until Christmas Day. Then most decorations are swiftly switched…

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